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What is Trodelvy?

Trodelvy is a brand-name prescription medication. It’s FDA-approved to treat:


Locally advanced* or metastatic† triple-negative breast cancer (mTNBC)‡ that’s unresectable (not able to be treated with surgery). Specifically, the drug is used in adults who’ve received at least two systemic therapies (treatment that affects your whole body). And at least one of the therapies was for metastatic cancer treatment.

Locally advanced or metastatic urothelial (bladder) cancer (mUC). Specifically, the drug is used in adults who’ve taken platinum-based chemotherapy and certain other immunotherapy medications for this cancer in the past.

To learn more about these conditions and how Trodelvy is used for them, see the “Trodelvy uses” section below.


* “Locally advanced” means the cancer has spread to nearby areas or lymph nodes.

† “Metastatic” means the cancer has spread to other parts of your body, such as your bones or brain.

‡ TNBC is a type of breast cancer that lacks certain proteins and receptors (attachments sites).


Drug details

Trodelvy contains the active ingredient sacituzumab govitecan-hziy, which is a biologic. Biologics are drugs made from living cells.


Trodelvy is a type of drug called an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC). It consists of an antibody (an immune system protein) that’s linked to a chemotherapy drug.


Trodelvy comes as a powder inside vials. A healthcare professional will mix the powder with liquid to make a solution. They will give the solution by intravenous infusion at an infusion clinic, hospital, or doctor’s office.


This drug is available in one strength: 180 milligrams (mg) per vial.


FDA approval

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) initially approved Trodelvy in 2020. At that time, the FDA only approved the drug for one type of cancer: mTNBC.


For its use for mUC, Trodelvy received accelerated approvalTrusted Sourcefrom the FDA in April 2021.


Accelerated approval is based on information from early clinical trials. The FDA will decide on full approval of Trodelvy for mUC after the completion of more clinical trials.


Typically, drugs receive approval from the FDA only after extensive trials have been completed. But in some situations, the FDA grants approval before all of the trials have been done. The FDA may grant accelerated approval if there aren’t many effective treatment options for a particular condition. This is the case for mUC.


Effectiveness

For information about the effectiveness of Trodelvy, see the “Trodelvy uses” section below.


Trodelvy generic or biosimilar

Trodelvy is available only as a brand-name medication. It’s not currently available in biosimilar form.


Biosimilar medications are similar to a brand-name biologic medication (their parent medication). Trodelvy is a biologic medication, which is also called a biologic.


Biologics are made from living cells. This means it isn’t possible to make a direct copy of them. A generic, on the other hand, is a medication made from chemicals. And generics are an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication.


Biosimilars are considered just as safe and effective as their parent drug. And like generics, biosimilars tend to cost less than brand-name medications.



Trodelvy cost

As with all medications, the cost of Trodelvy can vary. To find current prices for Trodelvy in your area, check out GoodRx.com.


Trodelvy

180mg vial (Qty: 1)

$2242

GoodRx Fair Price

See prices near you: 

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The cost you find on GoodRx.com is what you may pay without insurance. The actual price you’ll pay depends on your insurance plan and your treatment plan. It may also depend on your location.


Before approving coverage for Trodelvy, your insurance company may require you to get prior authorization. This means that your doctor and insurance company will need to communicate about your prescription before the insurance company will cover the drug. The insurance company will review the prior authorization request and decide if the drug will be covered.


If you’re not sure if you’ll need to get prior authorization for Trodelvy, contact your insurance company.


Financial and insurance assistance

If you need financial support to pay for Trodelvy or need help understanding your insurance coverage, help is available.


Gilead Sciences, Inc., the manufacturer of Trodelvy, offers a program called Trodelvy Access Support. This program offers options for cost savings and financial assistance. For more information and to find out if you’re eligible for support, call 844-TRODELVY (844-876-3358). You can also visit this page if you’re using Trodelvy for breast cancer or this page if you’re taking the drug for bladder cancer.


To learn more about saving money on prescriptions, check out this article.


Generic or biosimilar version

Trodelvy is available only as a brand-name medication. It’s not currently available in biosimilar form.


Biosimilar medications are similar to a brand-name biologic medication (their parent medication). Trodelvy is a biologic medication, which is also called a biologic.


Biologics are made from living cells. This means it isn’t possible to make a direct copy of them. A generic, on the other hand, is a medication made from chemicals. And generics are an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication.


Biosimilars are considered just as safe and effective as their parent drug. And like generics, biosimilars tend to cost less than brand-name medications.


How Trodelvy works

Trodelvy contains the active ingredient sacituzumab govitecan-hziy. It’s approved to treat certain types of:


triple-negative breast cancer

urothelial (bladder) cancer

For more information about these conditions and how Trodelvy is used for them, see the “Trodelvy uses” section below.


About cancer

Your body makes new cells to replace dying cells. Typically, your body stops your cells from growing too large or making too many cells. But with cancer, certain cells multiply (make more cells) and grow uncontrollably. These cells use up oxygen and nutrients and can take resources away from other cells in your body.


Over time, cancer cells can form tumors (mass of cancerous tissue). Cancer cells can also cause your immune system to not function normally, in addition to other problems in your body.


How Trodelvy works for cancer

Trodelvy is a type of drug called an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC). It consists of an antibody (an immune system protein) that’s linked to a chemotherapy drug. Trodelvy’s antibody is sacituzumab, and its chemotherapy drug is govitecan-hziy.


Trodelvy’s antibody attaches to a specific protein on the surface of cancer cells. This flags the cancer cells so that the immune system can detect and help destroy them.


Specifically, Trodelvy works by finding and attaching to a protein called Trop2. Certain types of cancer cells contain high levels of this protein.


When Trodelvy binds to Trop2, its chemotherapy drug enters the cancer cell. Once inside, the drug stops the cell’s growth, causing it to self-destruct.


Trodelvy is designed to help stop cancer cells from growing and spreading.


How long does it take to work?

Trodelvy begins working as you receive it. But you are unlikely to feel the drug working.


In clinical trials, Trodelvy helped keep cancer cells from growing and spreading. However, researchers didn’t look at whether it reduced people’s symptoms.


Your doctor can tell you more about how they’ll monitor whether Trodelvy is working for you.


Trodelvy dosage

The Trodelvy dosage your doctor prescribes will depend on several factors. These include:


your body weight

how the condition you’re using Trodelvy to treat responds to the medication

side effects that you have while being treated with Trodelvy

The following information describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. However, be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to fit your needs.


Drug forms and strengths

Trodelvy contains the active ingredient sacituzumab govitecan-hziy.


It comes as a powder inside vials. A healthcare professional will mix the powder with liquid to make a solution. They will give the solution by intravenous infusion at an infusion clinic, hospital, or doctor’s office.


This drug is available in one strength: 180 milligrams (mg) per vial.


Dosage for triple-negative breast cancer

Trodelvy’s dosage for breast cancer is calculated based on your body weight in kilograms (kg). (One kilogram is equal to about 2.2 pounds.)


The recommended dosage is 10 mg of drug per kg of body weight. You’ll receive this dose on days one and eight of each 21-day treatment cycle.


Each treatment cycle lasts for 3 weeks. So, you won’t receive a Trodelvy dose during the third week.


Dosage for advanced bladder cancer

Trodelvy’s dosage for bladder cancer is calculated based on your body weight in kilograms (kg). (One kilogram is equal to about 2.2 pounds.)


The recommended dosage is 10 mg of drug per kg of body weight. You’ll receive this dose on days one and eight of each 21-day treatment cycle.


Each treatment cycle lasts for 3 weeks. So, you won’t receive a Trodelvy dose during the third week.


What if I miss a dose?

If you miss your appointment for a Trodelvy dose, call your doctor’s office as soon as possible. Their staff will work with you to reschedule your infusion as soon as possible.


It’s important that you do not miss Trodelvy infusion appointments. Missing appointments can cause Trodelvy levels in your body to decrease. This may cause the medication not to work as well.


To help make sure that you don’t miss an appointment for your dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm or marking the appointment in your calendar. You could also download a reminder app on your phone.


Will I need to use this drug long term?

You and your doctor will determine how many treatment cycles of Trodelvy you will receive. Factors that may affect your number of treatment cycles include:


how your cancer responds to Trodelvy

any side effects that you may have from treatment

Trodelvy side effects

Trodelvy can cause mild or serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur while taking Trodelvy. These lists do not include all possible side effects.


For more information about the possible side effects of Trodelvy, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to manage any side effects that may be concerning or bothersome.


Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs it has approved. If you would like to notify the FDA about a side effect you’ve had with Trodelvy, you can do so through MedWatch.


Mild side effects

Mild side effects* of Trodelvy can include:


belly pain

constipation

cough

decreased appetite

diarrhea

insomnia

dizziness

hair loss**

headache

joint pain

nausea

fatigue

mouth sores

rash

vomiting

Most of these side effects may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. But if they become more severe or don’t go away, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.


* This is a partial list of mild side effects from Trodelvy. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or view Trodelvy’s prescribing information.

** For more information about this side effect, see “Side effect details” below.


Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Trodelvy can occur. But even so, most people are able to keep taking the drug.


Serious side effects can occur regardless of the condition Trodelvy is used to treat. However, in clinical trials, serious side effects were more common in people with bladder cancer than in people with breast cancer. Also, people with bladder cancer were more likely to stop taking Trodelvy due to serious side effects.


It’s not uncommon for doctors to temporarily pause Trodelvy treatment until serious side effects go away.


Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.


Serious side effects and their symptoms can include:


Acute (sudden) kidney damage. Symptoms can include:

confusion

decreased urination

nausea

fatigue or tiredness

shortness of breath

swelling in your feet or ankles

Anemia (low red blood cell level). Symptoms can include:

chest pain

feeling lightheaded

headache

irregular heart rate

shortness of breath

Blood clots. Symptoms affecting the area of the clot can include:

aches or cramps

pain, tenderness, or warmth

swelling

Serious infections, including pneumonia, bacteremia (bacteria in your bloodstream), and serious urinary tract infection (UTI). Symptoms can include:

chills

fever

low blood pressure

pressure or cramping in your groin

shortness of breath

Sepsis (severe immune reaction to an infection). Symptoms can include:

confusion

fever

rapid heart rate

shortness of breath or difficulty breathing

Obstruction in your small intestine. Symptoms can include:

bloating and cramping in your belly

constipation or obstipation

nausea

vomiting

Infusion reactions, which can happen after receiving an intravenous (IV) infusion of a drug. Symptoms can include any of the following, within 24 hours of getting a Trodelvy infusion:

chills

difficulty breathing

feeling dizzy or lightheaded

hives

itchy skin

low blood pressure

skin flushing

skin rash

swelling in your face, lips, throat, or tongue

Severe nausea and vomiting.

Neutropenia (low level of white blood cells called neutrophils).*†

Severe diarrhea.*†

Allergic reaction.*

* Trodelvy has a boxed warningTrusted Source regarding these risks. A boxed warning is the strongest warning required by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Boxed warnings alert doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

† For more information about this side effect, see “Side effect details” below.


Side effect details

Here’s some detail on certain side effects this drug may cause.


Low level of neutrophils

Trodelvy may cause neutropenia (a low level of white blood cells called neutrophils). In fact, the drug has a boxed warningTrusted Source about this risk.


A boxed warning is the most serious warning the FDA can give a medication. It alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.


Your body makes neutrophils to help fight infection and repair damaged body tissue. If your neutrophil level is too low, your body can’t respond to infections like usual.


Neutropenia was the most common side effect reported in Trodelvy’s clinical trials. Nearly half of the people who took the drug had severe neutropenia. (With severe neutropenia, your neutrophil levels are very low.) In most cases, their neutrophil level returned to normal after stopping Trodelvy for 2 to 3 weeks.


In rare cases, people receiving Trodelvy in these trials developed febrile neutropenia. This is a rare but life threatening type of neutropenia. With febrile neutropenia, you have:


a fever above 101°F or one that’s higher than 100.4°F for 1 hour or more, plus

a neutrophil level that’s below a certain cutoff

Symptoms of neutropenia


Neutropenia itself doesn’t cause symptoms. So, during your treatment, your doctor will order a blood test to check your neutrophil levels.


If your levels are too low, your doctor will likely pause your Trodelvy treatment. They’ll probably do this until your levels return to a healthy value. Your doctor will also give you a medication to help your neutrophil level increase. If your doctor has you resume treatment with Trodelvy, they’ll likely reduce your dosage going forward.


However, you may develop symptoms of infection due to neutropenia. In people with neutropenia, infections must be treated immediately. Symptoms of an infection can include:


chills

cough

fever

nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea

shortness of breath

What is done for neutropenia?


If you develop neutropenia more than twice while receiving Trodelvy, your doctor will likely recommend that you stop the medication. They may also recommend stopping treatment if you develop neutropenia that lasts longer than 3 weeks.


If you get febrile neutropenia or an infection while taking Trodelvy, your doctor will prescribe antibiotics. Depending on the severity of the infection or neutropenia, you may need treatment in the hospital.


After treatment, your doctor may recommend a medication to help your body make neutrophils. This medication helps prevent your level from becoming low again. To learn more about these medications, see “Trodelvy use with other drugs” below. You can also talk with your doctor or pharmacist.


Severe diarrhea

Trodelvy can cause severe diarrhea. In fact, the drug has a boxed warningTrusted Source for this risk.


A boxed warning is the most serious warning the FDA can give a medication. It alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.


Diarrhea was one of the most common side effects in people taking Trodelvy in clinical trials. In most people, this side effect was mild. However, in some people, it was severe.


Because of the risk for severe diarrhea, you should call your doctor if you get diarrhea with Trodelvy. Your doctor will want to check you for infection.


If your diarrhea is not caused by infection, your doctor may prescribe another medication to treat or prevent it. A few examples of those medications include:


loperamide (Imodium A-D)

atropine, diphenoxylate (Lomotil)

Your doctor will also likely have you temporarily stop taking Trodelvy until your diarrhea goes away or becomes less severe. Then, they’ll likely reduce your dose of Trodelvy when you resume treatment.


Your doctor may recommend fluid and electrolyte replacement if you develop diarrhea while taking Trodelvy.


Hair loss

It’s possible to have hair loss as a side effect from Trodelvy. This was one of the more common side effects reported in clinical trials. However, there were no reports of severe hair loss in the trials.


If you have hair loss with Trodelvy, you can talk with your doctor about it. They may recommend treatment for this side effect.


ALLERGIC REACTION

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after taking Trodelvy.


Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction, including infusion reactions, can include:


skin rash

itchiness

flushing

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:


swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet

swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat

trouble breathing

Call your doctor right away if you have an allergic reaction to Trodelvy, as the reaction could become severe. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.


Trodelvy uses

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs, such as Trodelvy, to treat certain conditions.


Trodelvy has received an indication to treat certain types of:


triple-negative breast cancer

urothelial (bladder) cancer

Below, we describe these conditions and how Trodelvy is used to treat them. To learn more, view our cancer hub and breast cancer hub.


Trodelvy for triple-negative breast cancer

Trodelvy is approved for use in adults with locally advanced* or metastatic† triple-negative breast cancer (mTNBC).


Specifically, it’s used for TNBC that is unresectable (not able to be treated with surgery). Also, adults prescribed Trodelvy for TNBC must have received at least two systemic therapies in the past. (Systemic therapy is a treatment that affects your whole body.) And at least one systemic therapy must have been for treating metastatic cancer.


“Triple-negative” breast cancer means the breast cancer doesn’t have the following:


HER2 protein

receptors (attachment sites) for estrogen and progesterone

Compared with other types of cancer, TNBC is more aggressive. And it’s also harder to treat.


Symptoms of breast cancer can include:


a lump in your breast or armpit

pain in your breast

changes in size or shape of your breast

nipple discharge

skin irritation on the breast

* “Locally advanced” means the cancer has spread to nearby areas or lymph nodes.

† “Metastatic” means the cancer has spread to other parts of your body, such as your bones or brain.


Effectiveness for triple-negative breast cancer

Trodelvy was found effective in treating TNBC. To see more information on how the drug performed in clinical trials, see Trodelvy’s full prescribing information.


The manufacturer of Trodelvy also provides information on Trodelvy’s effectiveness for TNBC on their website. You can also talk with your doctor to learn more.


Trodelvy for advanced bladder cancer

Trodelvy is prescribed for adults with locally advanced* or metastatic† urothelial (bladder) cancer (mUC).‡


For this use, Trodelvy is approved for use in adults whose bladder cancer has been treated in the past with both:


platinum-based chemotherapy

a PD-1 or PD-L1 immunotherapy medication, such as:

pembrolizumab (Keytruda)

durvalumab (Imfinzi)

Symptoms of bladder cancer can include:


blood in your urine

changes in your bladder habits, such as:

urinating more often than usual

having to get up often at night to urinate

difficulty urinating or having a weak urine stream

pain or burning while urinating

* “Locally advanced” means the cancer has spread to nearby areas or lymph nodes.

† “Metastatic” means the cancer has spread to other parts of your body, such as your bones or brain.

‡ For this use, Trodelvy received accelerated approvalTrusted Source from the FDA. Accelerated approval is based on information from early clinical trials. The FDA’s decision for full approval will be made after additional clinical trials are completed.


Effectiveness for advanced bladder cancer

Trodelvy was found to be effective in treating bladder cancer. To see more information on how the drug performed in clinical trials, see Trodelvy’s full prescribing information. You can also talk with your doctor for more information.


Trodelvy and children

Trodelvy is not approved for treating any condition in children. The drug has not been studied in children. Also, the conditions Trodelvy is used to treat don’t usually occur in children.


Trodelvy use with other drugs

It’s likely that you’ll take Trodelvy with other drugs.


Before each Trodelvy infusion, your doctor will probably give you medications to help prevent certain side effects. These side effects may include nausea, vomiting, and infusion reactions.


The medications your doctor prescribes may include:


a medication to prevent fever, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol)

a histamine blocker, such as diphenhydramine (Benadryl)

a corticosteroid, such as dexamethasone

a nausea medication, such as ondansetron (Zofran) or aprepitant (Emend)

Additionally, some people may develop neutropenia (low level of white blood cells called neutrophils)* with Trodelvy treatment. Your doctor may recommend a medication to help your neutrophil level increase. These medications are known as granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSFs).


An example of a G-CSF includes filgrastim (Neupogen). Talk with your doctor for more information about G-CSFs and their use with Trodelvy.



Common questions about Trodelvy

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Trodelvy.


How is Trodelvy different from traditional chemotherapy?

Traditional chemotherapy drugs work by killing cells in your body that are rapidly growing. Cancer cells are usually fast-growing, so chemotherapy works on them.


However, healthy cells, such as hair cells, can also be fast-growing. So, chemotherapy can also affect certain healthy cells, increasing your risk for side effects.


Trodelvy works by finding and attaching to a protein found on cancer cells. This protein is called Trop2. When Trodelvy binds to Trop2, it sends signals within the cancer cell that cause it to self-destruct. This helps stop cancer cells from growing and spreading further.


To learn more about how this drug works, see the “How Trodelvy works” section above.


Clinical trials compared Trodelvy with traditional chemotherapy for treating triple-negative breast cancer*. You can see how Trodelvy’s safety and effectiveness compared to conventional chemotherapy by checking out the drug’s full prescribing information. You can also talk with your doctor to learn more about how Trodelvy differs from traditional chemotherapy.


*This is a certain type of breast cancer that Trodelvy is approved to treat. To learn more about it, see the “Trodelvy uses” section above.


Does Trodelvy cure cancer?

No, Trodelvy isn’t a cure for cancer. In fact, there currently isn’t a cure for cancer.


In clinical trials, treatment with Trodelvy helped stop certain cancers from growing and getting worse. To learn more about how Trodelvy works for treating these cancers, see the “Trodelvy Uses” section above. You can also check out the drug’s full prescribing information or talk with your doctor.


Can I take any medications to help reduce Trodelvy’s side effects?

Some medications can be used to help reduce or prevent Trodelvy’s side effects.


For instance, before each Trodelvy infusion, your doctor will likely give you medications to help prevent certain side effects. These side effects may include nausea, vomiting, and infusion reactions. To learn more about the medications used for this purpose, see the “Trodelvy use with other drugs” section above.


If you develop diarrhea* while you’re taking Trodelvy, your doctor will likely recommend loperamide (Imodium A-D). Or they’ll recommend another anti-diarrheal medication for you. To learn more about diarrhea and Trodelvy, see “Side effect details” in the “Trodelvy side effects” section above.


Some people may develop neutropenia (low level of white blood cells called neutrophils)* with Trodelvy. Because of this, your doctor may recommend a medication to help your body make neutrophils. To learn more, see the “Trodelvy use with other drugs” section above.


If you have additional questions about medications you might take with Trodelvy, talk with your doctor.



Trodelvy and alcohol

There’s no known interaction between alcohol and Trodelvy.


However, drinking alcohol could make certain side effects of Trodelvy worse. Or, doing so could increase your risk of having side effects. These side effects can include:


nausea

vomiting

diarrhea, which may be severe*

fatigue

If you drink alcohol, ask your doctor about how much is safe for you to drink while you’re taking Trodelvy.


* Trodelvy has a boxed warningTrusted Source regarding the risk of severe diarrhea. A boxed warning is the strongest warning required by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Boxed warnings alert doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous. For more information about this side effect, see “Trodelvy side effects” above.


Trodelvy interactions

Trodelvy can interact with several other medications.


Different interactions can cause different effects. For instance, some interactions can interfere with how well a drug works. Other interactions can increase side effects or make them more severe.


Trodelvy and other medications

Medications that can interact with Trodelvy are described below. This article does not contain all drugs that may interact with Trodelvy.


Before taking Trodelvy, talk with your doctor and pharmacist. Tell them about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also, tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.


If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.


Medications that can interact with Trodelvy include those described below.


Drugs that can increase Trodelvy levels in your body

Taking drugs that increase your Trodelvy level can increase your risk for side effects from the drug. Due to this interaction, doctors typically will not prescribe these drugs with Trodelvy.


Examples include:


certain protease inhibitors, such as:

atazanavir (Reyataz)

ritonavir (Norvir)

combination drug lopinavir/ritonavir (Kaletra)

certain tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), such as:

sorafenib (Nexavar)

nilotinib (Tasigna)

levothyroxine (Synthroid), a thyroid hormone replacement medication

everolimus (Afinitor), a medication used in organ transplant and certain cancers

the sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors:

canagliflozin (Invokana)

dapagliflozin (Farxiga)

Drugs that can decrease Trodelvy levels in your body

The antibiotic rifampin (Rifadin) can decrease Trodelvy levels in your body. This may make Trodelvy less effective for you. Due to this interaction, doctors typically will not prescribe rifampin with Trodelvy.


Trodelvy and herbs and supplements

There aren’t any herbs or supplements that have been specifically reported to interact with Trodelvy. However, you should still check with your doctor or pharmacist before using any of these products while taking Trodelvy.


Trodelvy and foods

There aren’t any foods that have been specifically reported to interact with Trodelvy. If you have any questions about eating certain foods with Trodelvy, talk with your doctor.


How Trodelvy is given

Trodelvy is given by intravenous infusion. A healthcare professional will administer this drug at an infusion clinic, hospital, or doctor’s office.


For your first infusion, a healthcare professional will infuse Trodelvy for about 3 hours. If your body tolerates the first infusion, your following doses will likely be infused over 1 to 2 hours.


You won’t need a port to receive a Trodelvy infusion. (A port is a tube that’s implanted into a vein, allowing for the infusion or injection of a medication.) But if you already have a port, a healthcare professional may use it for your Trodelvy infusions.


When it’s given

You’ll receive Trodelvy once each week for 2 weeks during a 21-day treatment cycle. Since a treatment cycle lasts 3 weeks, you won’t get a Trodelvy dose during the third week. Your doctor will determine how many treatment cycles you’ll receive.


Factors that may affect the number of treatment cycles you receive include:


how your cancer responds to Trodelvy

side effects that you may have from treatment

To help make sure that you don’t miss an appointment for your dose, try using a medication reminder for your appointments. This can include setting an alarm or using a timer. You could also download a reminder app on your phone.


What to expect when it’s given

You may be wondering what to expect on Trodelvy infusion days. The drug’s manufacturer offers detailed information on their website, which you can view here.


Before each Trodelvy infusion, your doctor will give you medications to help prevent certain side effects. These side effects may include infusion reactions, nausea, and vomiting. For more information about infusion reactions with Trodelvy, see the “Trodelvy side effects” section above. For more information about these medications, see the “Trodelvy use with other drugs” section. Or, talk with your doctor to learn more.


A healthcare professional will monitor you for infusion reactions during your Trodelvy infusion. And they’ll continue monitoring you for at least 30 minutes after the end of the infusion. If you have a reaction to the Trodelvy infusion, they may:


increase the amount of time over which your infusion is given

temporarily pause your infusion

However, if your reaction is severe or life threatening, your doctor may stop the infusion and give you medications for the reaction. Then, they’ll likely have you permanently stop treatment with Trodelvy.


Receiving Trodelvy with food

Because Trodelvy is given into your vein, it won’t react with food. You can get Trodelvy infusions after eating or on an empty stomach.


However, keep in mind that you may experience nausea and vomiting as a side effect of Trodelvy infusions. It can be helpful to eat small meals consisting of bland food before or after your Trodelvy infusion.


Trodelvy and pregnancy

Trodelvy is not safe to use during pregnancy. Based on how the drug works, Trodelvy may cause harm to a pregnancy if you take it while pregnant.


If you can become pregnant, your doctor will order a pregnancy test before prescribing Trodelvy. This is to make sure you’re not pregnant before you begin treatment.


If you become pregnant while taking Trodelvy, call your doctor right away. They’ll likely have you stop treatment with Trodelvy. Your doctor can discuss other treatments options.


Trodelvy and fertility

Based on animal studies, treatment with Trodelvy may affect the ability to become pregnant.


If you are concerned about how Trodelvy can affect your ability to become pregnant, talk with your doctor. They may recommend a different treatment for your condition.


Trodelvy and birth control

Trodelvy is not safe to take during pregnancy. If you’re sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about your birth control needs while you’re using Trodelvy.


For more information about taking Trodelvy during pregnancy, see the “Trodelvy and pregnancy” section above.


For females using Trodelvy

If you’re female* who can become pregnant, your doctor will recommend that you use effective birth control while you’re taking Trodelvy. They’ll also have you continue using birth control for at least 6 months after your last dose. Your doctor can discuss birth control options with you.


* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the terms “male” and “female” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.


For males using Trodelvy

If you’re male* and you have a sexual partner who can become pregnant, your doctor will recommend that you and your partner use effective birth control. You should do this while you’re taking Trodelvy and for at least 3 months after your last dose. Your doctor can discuss effective birth control options with you.


* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the terms “male” and “female” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.


Trodelvy and breastfeeding

You should not breastfeed while you’re taking Trodelvy.


It’s not known whether Trodelvy is present in human breast milk. However, if the drug is present, there is a risk for serious side effects in a child who is breastfed. Because of this, it’s not recommended to breastfeed while receiving Trodelvy. You also shouldn’t breastfeed for at least 1 month after your last dose of the medication.


If you have questions about feeding your child while you’re taking Trodelvy, talk with your doctor.


Trodelvy precautions

This drug comes with several precautions.


FDA warnings

This drug has boxed warningsTrusted Source. A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.


Severe or life-threatening neutropenia

Rarely, treatment with Trodelvy can cause severe or life threatening neutropenia. (With this condition, you have a low level of certain types of white blood cells.) This can make getting an infection more likely, and your body won’t be able to fight off the infection as well as usual.


Your doctor will monitor your white blood cell levels during treatment with Trodelvy. They may have you temporarily stop the medication if your levels become too low.


They may also instruct you to stop Trodelvy if you develop febrile neutropenia (a fever with very low white blood cell levels). If you get febrile neutropenia, your doctor will likely prescribe an antibiotic. In some cases, you may need treatment in a hospital for this condition.


Severe diarrhea

Diarrhea occurs in many people who take Trodelvy. If you develop severe diarrhea, your doctor may have you temporarily stop treatment with Trodelvy.


They may have you stop the drug until your symptoms are reduced or go away. Your doctor will likely check for an infection if you get diarrhea while taking Trodelvy.


They’ll also probably recommend that you take an anti-diarrheal medication until your diarrhea goes away for at least 12 hours. Your doctor may also suggest drinking lots of water or consuming a fluid and electrolyte replacement drink.


Other precautions

Before taking Trodelvy, talk with your doctor about your health history. Trodelvy may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health. These include:


Reduced UGT1A1 activity. If you’ve been told you have reduced activity of a gene called UGT1A1, you may be at higher risk for side effects from Trodelvy. These could include serious side effects such as neutropenia (low white blood cell levels called neutrophils). This includes people with a certain gene that causes reduced activity of UGT1A1. If your doctor prescribes Trodelvy, they may monitor you more closely during treatment. And if you develop side effects, they’ll likely reduce your dose or recommend that you stop Trodelvy.

Liver problems. If you have a moderate or severe liver problem, your doctor may not prescribe Trodelvy. This drug has not been studied in people with moderate or severe liver problems. So, it’s not known if it’s safe or effective in this group of people. If your liver problem is mild, Trodelvy is probably safe for you to take. But, your doctor may monitor you more closely than usual during treatment. Your doctor can tell you more about the severity of any liver problems you have. They may also order a blood test to check your liver function.

Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Trodelvy or any of its ingredients, your doctor will likely not prescribe Trodelvy. Ask your doctor what other medications are better options for you.

Pregnancy. You shouldn’t take Trodelvy if you’re pregnant. For more information, see the “Trodelvy and pregnancy” section above.

Breastfeeding. You shouldn’t breastfeed while taking Trodelvy for at least 1 month after your last dose. For more information, see the “Trodelvy and breastfeeding” section above.

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of Trodelvy, see the “Trodelvy side effects” section above.


Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.

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